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Incredible That Business Reputation is Overlooked

By business articles and experts like Harvard Business and the Fiscal Times reputation is brought up over and over. Though in many cases not directly said reputations are being discussed. Even though employee engagement, motivation, spending cuts, and asking more may be the topics, the reflection is on the companies. Here’s an example. http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2012/01/21/Too-Cheap-with-Your-Valued-Staff-Know-the-Risks.aspx

When the economy is poor the companies are in even more power. Really where is an employee going to go? The perception is there are no jobs out there. But as stated so well in the above article there will be repercussions. But instead of employees leaving let’s talk about when they quit and stay.

If employee disengagement is getting mentioned this is really about employees doing the least or minimum in their jobs. In other words they are getting by. It’s not bad enough for termination and it’s not good enough for recognition and praise. For various reason but mostly because there is now a dis-connect from their manager or company and there is a feeling they are not cared about. Thus the response becomes quitting, well as much as is possible and still keep the job.

There is a lot of talk happening about employee engagement because it has huge costs. There are the monetary costs of course but there are also the costs in poor customer service, employees being indifferent or showing frustrations, customers leaving, employees leaving, and yes the company’s reputation.

What the discussions need to start focusing on is the ways to correct this. This is not and will not be a quick fix. Nor should it be. Once the training has been done to the front line managers and the employees are responding with more engagement there must also be an emphasis on the maintenance of the team.

Everything a manager or business does affects the reputation. And employees notice.

http://fromthefrontmanagement.com

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When a Team Begins to Break Down

Most of the time when a manager, supervisor, or coach takes over a team they are not building it from scratch. Instead a team has been a team for awhile or at the very least a group of people have been together for awhile. At times this is looked at as the team already exists and just needs to go on with maybe some tweaking along the way. I’m going to suggest not to look at it this way. I’m suggesting to look at it as building a new team.

Before anything is done in changes take the time to observe this team as a whole and the individual member of the team. Tell your boss that you are going to do this. This does a few things. First it allows you in a relaxed manner to get to know people a little, the team members relax and act more themselves, you see what works and get a sense of what needs to be changed, and the group did not feel like everything was going to change immediately. Most often this is the start of a good relationship.

Don’t just change things for the sake of changing things. See what works and leave it alone for awhile. As you have your goals of where the team needs to go, you can now use your observations of the individuals to put them in the roles you think will be the strongest. This is also a great time to give people something new because it naturally gets people recharged. It is terrific to explain why this is happening and showing the goal you have in mind that you want to see the team reach. This is not always a concrete goal but might be simply seeing the team come together more, help each other, or being precise.

Going a little slower allows the member of the team to feel you are a part of the team before changes were made. I find there is less resistance this way with the flow coming easier.

Liz Cosline – Ownership Coach/Team Enhancer

http://fromthefrontmanagement.com

 

 

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